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A People of Color Majority Alters Politics. Movements Change the World

November 08, 2012 at 8:00 am by: seeta Category: 2012 Election, Anti-Racism, Civil Rights, Economic Development, Education, Housing, Immigration, Intersectionality, LGBTQ, Poverty, Science/Technology, Voting Rights, White Privilege

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From Colorlines:

Black voters turned out overwhelmingly for Obama. Millennial voters, who represent the start of the next demographic phase, did too. Republicans are blaming each other for losing the Latino vote; Steve Schmidt, head of McCain’s 2008 campaign, told MSNBC this was the last election that someone could possibly win without getting a good portion of Latinos, which of course Gov. Romney didn’t. Mike Huckabee said Republicans have done a terrible job of reaching out to people of color, while DREAMers are claiming credit—and I’ll give it to them—for forcing POTUS’s hand to deliver the Deferred Action executive order, which in turn delivered him many Latino votes.

But demographics alone aren’t going to run a policy agenda through the system. It’s not like we, people of color, can just exist and, as a result, lead politicians to pass helpful policies simply by asking. Huge challenges remain in economic justice, immigration, environment, education and housing reform. The nation’s understanding of what it will take to generate racial, economic and gender equity remains shallow, focused largely on how new constituencies threaten the old white way, per Bill O’Reilly.

But if we keep doing our work, if we keep fighting, that collective understanding will deepen in ways that make some real breakthroughs possible.

The last four years has taught me that presidents matter, but movements matter more. Politicians, and everyday Americans too, do great things when movements make it impossible to do anything else. The tone and energy that went into preventing voter suppression, combined with the tone and energy of my polling place this morning, is what we need to ride for the next four years. It is an outraged, urgent force that changes how we look at things, combined with a respectful inclusiveness that enables everyone to participate.

3 comments
KayWhitlock
KayWhitlock like.author.displayName 1 Like

This is a terrific piece; thanks for posting it, Seeta!