6 comments
KayWhitlock
KayWhitlock

Thank you, Nancy.  Hard to find words.  "Stand Your Ground" will one day be seen as an extension of lynching, because that, at base, is what it protects.  Giving civilians the same authority as police to kill unarmed people of color.  By definition, a person of color, especially a black man, constitutes the presence of danger itself.  I hope all those white folks who swear they would have opposed lynching are showing up in droves at their statehouses and organizing campaigns.  We all have our chance now to be organizing against such mainstreamed racism.


nancy a heitzeg
nancy a heitzeg moderator

Just in ---

For Immediate Release



Statement to the Press
Not guilty but still in prison: Justice denied to Marissa Alexander



An appalling injustice took place today in Jacksonville, Florida when Judge James Daniel failed to grant Marissa Alexander's request to be released on bond until a verdict is reached in her new trial that begins March 31, 2014. Another status hearing on the case was set for January 15. At the end of September, a Florida Appeals Court threw out the guilty verdict against Ms. Alexander and ordered a new trial due to severe problems in the instructions to the jury. With the overturn of the original verdict, Marissa Alexander is no longer guilty in the eyes of the law, but she is still in prison.

Marissa Alexander, an African American mother and daughter, was sentenced to 20 years for firing a warning shot to stop an attack by her abusive ex-husband -- an act of self-defense that injured no one. She was denied a Stand Your Ground defense. She has already been separated from her young children and family for nearly three years. The youngest was only 9 days old when the domestic violence incident occurred.

Release on personal recognizance or bond is supposed to be allowed to defendants who present no risk of flight or danger to the community. This mother of three is firmly rooted in the Jacksonville community by her connections to family, children and friends. She poses no danger to the public. Or has the state of Florida decided that she is a danger for the sole reason that she is a black woman?

It is well documented that black women and other marginalized people are likely to be criminalized, prosecuted, and incarcerated while trying to navigate and survive the conditions of violence in their lives. This is especially true for black women who are subjected to racist stereotypes that paint them as overly aggressive and unworthy.

The Free Marissa Now Mobilization Campaign is undaunted in our passion to win Marissa Alexander's release. We have launched the Marissa Alexander Freedom Fund campaign to raise $10,000 by the end of the year to help pay for legal costs of the new trial. Donors can give at tiny.cc/freedomfundraiser.

Our movement is thousands strong and we will keep going.

We have a trial to help win and we will continue to organize for Marissa's freedom and the end of domestic violence and mass incarceration. The world is watching and we will not rest until justice is won.

Free Marissa Now Mobilization Campaign is a grassroots campaign led by a core of organizers representing the African American/Black Women's Cultural Alliance, New Jim Crow Movement - Jacksonville, Radical Women, INCITE!, Southern Freedom Movement, and the Pacific Northwest Alliance to Free Marissa Alexander. To arrange an interview, please contact FreeMarissaNow@gmail.com or call 904-458-7576 (Jacksonville), 443-812-9503, (Washington, DC area), 206-473-0630 (Seattle)

nancy a heitzeg
nancy a heitzeg moderator

@KayWhitlockThis --

I hope all those white folks who swear they would have opposed lynching are showing up in droves at their statehouses and organizing campaigns.  We all have our chance now to be organizing against such mainstreamed racism

No excuses now

Trackbacks

  1. […] Why don’t they make clear recommendations regarding the racially-biased enforcement of “race neutral” laws and law enforcement policies, ranging from “stop and frisk” to “gang” laws […]

  2. […] racial disparity. Nor does it acknowledge the extreme irony of state’s rights supporters of Stand Your Ground, the opponents of the 14th Amendment, the Voting Rights Act and more making coded appeals to the […]

  3. […] cannot make the case for the humanity of its Black victims, knowing that only some are granted ground to stand or selves to […]