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Welcome to the ‘Arts and Culture’ Archive


Here you will find all archived articles and posts under the selected category. Thank you for visiting and supporting the movement.

Revelations: Troubadours

April 26, 2015 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Arts and Culture, Intersectionality, Sunday Music Flashback, What People are Doing to Change the World

Trumpet by Jean-Michel Basquiat, 1984

Trumpet by Jean-Michel Basquiat, 1984

Minnesota Orchestra to premiere ‘American Nomad’ trumpet concerto

 “The trumpet is a messenger or troubadour. It’s a call and response. It’s an alarm. It brings us together.”  ~ Steve Heitzeg

“Nobel Symphony” excerpt #3 – Steve Heitzeg
Performed by Philip Brunelle and the VocalEssence Chorus with the Minnesota Boychoir and Gustavus Adolphus College Symphony Orchestra. Charles Lazarus, solo trumpet.

How “Hate” Lets Us Off the Hook

April 05, 2015 By: seeta Category: Anti-Racism, Arts and Culture, Civil Rights, Criminal Injustice Series, Prison Industrial Complex

Authors Kay Whitlock (left), co-editor of Criminal InJustice, and Michael Bronski (right) have published a new book “Considering Hate” that is required reading. This is a transformative text that not only presents us with provocative questions about who we have been and who we are as a civilization, but also how we can rise above simplistic dichotomies of “Us” v. “Them” in our own everyday activism (whether on a micro or macro scale). The bottom-line is that we are no better than our so-called “enemies” when we embrace this dichotomous thinking which only serves to perpetuate division and destructive behaviors. As Whitlock and Bronkski argue, we are interdependent beings and must endeavor to find more constructive ways forward on all fronts.

From Beacon Press:

Over the centuries American society has been plagued by brutality fueled by disregard for the humanity of others: systemic violence against Native peoples, black people, and immigrants. More recent examples include the Steubenville rape case and the murders of Matthew Shepard, Jennifer Daugherty, Marcelo Lucero, and Trayvon Martin. Most Americans see such acts as driven by hate. But is this right? Longtime activists and political theorists Kay Whitlock and Michael Bronski boldly assert that American society’s reliance on the framework of hate to explain these acts is wrongheaded, misleading, and ultimately harmful.

Truthout has an in-depth and insightful interview up with both authors:

As Kay Whitlock and Michael Bronski outline in their brilliant new book, Considering Hate, we are all much more likely to view hate as residing elsewhere – not within ourselves, but within inferior others, whom we can disdain and distance ourselves from. Our political realities become determined by whom we are against.

In their book, Whitlock and Bronski dedicate themselves to both interrogating the hate frame – digging into its history, its construction, its uses, its tactics – and moving beyond it. They ask: “What would it look like to disentangle hate from justice, and replace the language of hate with that of goodness?” What does the language of goodness even look like, and how do we imagine our way there? In the following interview, Whitlock and Bronski illuminate the anatomy of hate – and show how a transformative imagination, built on compassion and an acknowledgement of interdependence, can guide our way forward.

Full interview here.

Revelations: Ôstara

April 05, 2015 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Arts and Culture, Eco-Justice, Spirituality

Revelations: #LiveLongAndProsper

March 01, 2015 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Arts and Culture, Intersectionality, Sunday Music Flashback

Revelations: Birdman/Icarcus/Phoenix

February 22, 2015 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Arts and Culture, Intersectionality, Sunday Music Flashback

Revelations: Koyaanisqatsi

February 15, 2015 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Arts and Culture, Civil Rights, Eco-Justice, Economic Terrorism, What People are Doing to Change the World

The Last Rainforest  Keith Haring 1989

The Last Rainforest
Keith Haring 1989

Keith Haring: The Political Line | de Young

US faces worst droughts in 1,000 years, predict scientists

Greenland’s hidden meltwater lakes store up trouble

Global Divestment Day: ‘We are ready for urgent action on climate change’

(more…)

Revelations: “Everybody Knows…”

February 08, 2015 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Arts and Culture, Eco-Justice, Intersectionality, What People are Doing to Change the World

"Everybody Knows Where Meat Comes From, It Comes from  the Store" Keith Haring, 1978

“Everybody Knows Where Meat Comes From It Comes from the Store.” Keith Haring, 1978

Keith Haring: The Political Line | de Young

Revelations: I Shot a Man in Reno…

January 25, 2015 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Anti-Racism, Arts and Culture, Civil Rights, Criminal Injustice Series, Intersectionality, Prison Industrial Complex

Legal Debate on Using Boastful Rap Lyrics as a Smoking Gun

 Meet Tiny Doo, the rapper facing life in prison for making an album

As rappers go, Brandon Duncan’s approach is not unusual: his lyrics reflect the violent reality of the streets. But in the pantheon of rappers who have had run-ins with the courts, Tiny Doo looms large. Despite his lack of a criminal record, Duncan stands accused of nine counts of participating in a “criminal street gang conspiracy”, charges that could land him in prison for life.

But Duncan is not charged with participating in any of the crimes underlying the conspiracy, or even agreeing to them. Rather, he’s effectively on trial for making a rap album…

Putting a musician on trial for his lyrics is antithetical to Americans’ free speech rights, and quite possibly unconstitutional. What’s more, the “criminal street gang conspiracy” law that Duncan is charged with violating – part of an anti-gang initiative package passed by California voters in 2000 – stands in marked contrast to conspiracy as California has traditionally defined it.

Ordinarily, to be guilty of conspiracy in California an individual must agree with another person to commit a crime, then at least one of them must take action to further that conspiracy. The charge Duncan faces requires no such agreement: so long as prosecutors can show that Duncan is an active member of the gang and knows about its general criminal activity, past or present, he can be convicted for benefiting from its acts…

black line Capture