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Welcome to the ‘Economic Terrorism’ Archive


Here you will find all archived articles and posts under the selected category. Thank you for visiting and supporting the movement.

Revelations: Turn Out the Lights…

May 03, 2015 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Arts and Culture, Eco-Justice, Economic Terrorism, Sunday Music Flashback

“Irreversible Collapse?”

Revelations: “Water, water, everywhere, Nor any drop to drink”

April 19, 2015 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Eco-Justice, Economic Terrorism, Intersectionality

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California’s Water Disaster Is Confusing, So We Drew Pictures

  • About 80 percent of California’s water goes to agriculture.
  • 50 percent of the average Californian’s water footprint comes from meat and dairy consumption alone.
  • You need 7.7 cubic meters of water to produce 1 pound of beef. That’s like 77 baths.

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  • 1 gram of beef protein requires six times as much water as 1 gram of protein from beans, peas or lentils.
  • 1 calorie from beef also requires 20 times as much water as 1 calorie from grains or starchy roots.
  • It takes 132 gallons of water for a slaughterhouse to process just one animal.
  • Tt takes 30 gallons of water to make one glass of dairy milk.

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CI: Commodified and Caged, Still

April 15, 2015 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Criminal Injustice Series, Eco-Justice, Economic Terrorism, Intersectionality, Police Brutality, Police State, Prison Industrial Complex

Criminal InJustice is a weekly series devoted to taking action against inequities in the U.S. criminal justice system. Nancy A. Heitzeg, Professor of Sociology and Race/Ethnicity, is the Editor of CI. Kay Whitlock, co-author of Queer (In)Justice, is contributing editor of CI. Criminal Injustice is published every Wednesday at 6 pm.

Commodified and Caged, Still
by nancy a heitzeg

Authors Note: This piece is an old one, whose time is always now.  It was originally published elsewhere, under a different name, for my anti-capitalist comrades. The goal, as you will see, was to illustrate the deep connections between speciesism, commodification and social inequalities. And yes, it was a call to Open the Cages.

So why not for Criminal InJustice? Certainly, “criminals” are routinely “de-humanized” — described as mere “animals”, “monsters”, and “brutes”. And treated as such then — caged, penned, crated, occasionally exhibited, brutalized, slaughtered. Commodified too — a ready source of profit from neo-slave labor, privatized contracts, and sometimes, even for “acres of skin”.

And why not again now? In a time of endless death on video loop, where victims, they say,  are “shot down like dogs in the street” by those that some call “pigs”, foundational  specieism is revealed in theory and practice. Our conceptions of both victims and villains rest on the assumptions that humans are better, deserve better. This leaves unquestioned and in fact perpetuates the very paradigm of domination – of dogs, of pigs, of the planet – that is the model for our treatment of dehumanized others.

As i have written elsewhere:

It is a hard and unpopular truth to say that all oppressions are connected, to say that our treatment of other species and the Earth herself has served as the template for our oppression of peoples. But it has.

It is a harder and even more unpopular truth to say that all oppressions must be undone and undone together. The lust for the false power derived from relations of domination – directed anywhere – is at the root.

What if the prison industrial complex and the social inequality which under girds it were somehow undone? What would prevent the lingering desire to crate the sow, cage the bird, chain the dog, beat the horse, gore the ox from erupting – again towards us – in some newly imagined and monstrous application?

The Answer is Nothing.

In this time of endless death on video loop, the inclination is to hunker down, narrow the focus, save our own, save who we can. But what if,  instead, now is the time to explode the vision, broaden the scope, fight for every and all breathes?

The fate of The Last Rhino is not marginal to or disconnected from the blood in the streets and the slaughterhouses, from the personal violence of our homes and that perpetrated by our social structures.

It is at the Center; it is of the very Essence.

Open the Cages and Open Them All.

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CI: The Irrelevance of “Innocence”

March 25, 2015 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Anti-Racism, Civil Rights, Corrupt Judiciary, Corrupt Legislature, Criminal Injustice Series, Economic Terrorism, Intersectionality, Police Brutality, Police State, Prison Industrial Complex

Criminal InJustice is a weekly series devoted to taking action against inequities in the U.S. criminal justice system. Nancy A. Heitzeg, Professor of Sociology and Race/Ethnicity, is the Editor of CI. Kay Whitlock, co-author of Queer (In)Justice, is contributing editor of CI. Criminal Injustice is published every Wednesday at 6 pm.

The Irrelevance of “Innocence”
by nancy a heitzeg

It was with great trepidation that i finally forced myself to read the Department Of Justice Report Regarding The Criminal Investigation Into The Shooting Death Of Michael Brown By Ferguson, Missouri Police Officer Darren Wilson. I opened it long after i had reviewed the companion DOJ Investigation of the Ferguson Police Department. And, it is in that order that they must be read. Whatever happened on Canfield Drive on that tragic day surely unfolded under the heavy canopy of occupation, under the sway of a corrupt police department that held the city under siege, that heavily targeted, brutalized, and then paid the bills on the backs of Blacks.

The report is a gut-wrenching read – tangled and traumatized witnesses, a pervasive climate of rumor and fear, an impossibly high legal bar for Federal Civil Rights prosecution, and the forgone conclusion that there could be no indictment, save for the piercing sentence found in the final paragraph of the report:

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Revelations: Wildlife War

March 22, 2015 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Eco-Justice, Economic Terrorism, Intersectionality

Trophy hunters reflected in eye of dead zebra, Equus quagga, Okavanga Delta, Botswana by Franz Lantling

Trophy hunters reflected in eye of dead zebra, Equus quagga, Okavanga Delta, Botswana  Photo by Franz Lantling

Africa is centre of a ‘wildlife war’ that the world is losing

“The northern white rhino is heading the way of the dinosaurs. With only five left on Earth – three in Kenya, one in America, and one in the Czech Republic – extinction is now inevitable. It survived for millions of years, but could not survive mankind.

This is just one subspecies, but soon the planet’s remaining 28,500 rhinos could be under threat from the illegal wildlife trade. Worth up to £12bn a year, it has joined drugs, arms and human trafficking as one of the world’s biggest crime rackets. Ground zero in this “wildlife war” is Africa, and the conservationists are losing as animals are slaughtered on an industrial scale to meet demand for horn and ivory in newly affluent Asian countries.

Urgent solutions will be debated this week in Kasane, Botswana, as politicians and environmentalists gather for a follow-up to last year’s much-trumpeted London conference on the crisis…

More than a year later, however, when the Kasane summit reviews whether these commitments have been implemented, it seems likely that some will be found wanting. Despite a celebrity-led drive to raise awareness in China and Vietnam, where horn is coveted as an ingredient in traditional medicine or as a status symbol, a record 1,215 rhinos were killed last year in South Africa, 20% more than in 2013.

At least 220 chimpanzees, 106 orang-utans, 33 bonobos and 15 gorillas have been lost from the wild over the past 14 months, according to estimates by the Great Apes Survival Partnership. Elephants also remain under siege – at least 20,000 were poached annually from 2011 to 2013, according to the UN – although countries such as Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda have fought back with some measure of success over the past year.”

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Revelations: Koyaanisqatsi

February 15, 2015 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Arts and Culture, Civil Rights, Eco-Justice, Economic Terrorism, What People are Doing to Change the World

The Last Rainforest  Keith Haring 1989

The Last Rainforest
Keith Haring 1989

Keith Haring: The Political Line | de Young

US faces worst droughts in 1,000 years, predict scientists

Greenland’s hidden meltwater lakes store up trouble

Global Divestment Day: ‘We are ready for urgent action on climate change’

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CI: #FreeMLK

January 21, 2015 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Anti-Racism, Civil Rights, Criminal Injustice Series, Economic Development, Economic Terrorism, Housing, Intersectionality, What People are Doing to Change the World

Criminal InJustice is a weekly series devoted to taking action against inequities in the U.S. criminal justice system. Nancy A. Heitzeg, Professor of Sociology and Race/Ethnicity, is the Editor of CI. Kay Whitlock, co-author of Queer (In)Justice, is contributing editor of CI. Criminal Injustice is published every Wednesday at 6 pm.

 

#FreeMLK
by nancy a heitzeg

In anticipation of the National Holiday bearing his name,  Ferguson Action announced their intention to #ReclaimMLK; “Unfortunately, Dr. King’s legacy has been clouded by efforts to soften, sanitize, and commercialize it. Impulses to remove Dr. King from the movement that elevated him must end. We resist efforts to reduce a long history marred with the blood of countless women and men into iconic images of men in suits behind pulpits .”

The Radical King was a tactical genius in the implementation of targeted direct action campaigns, a civil disobedient – a breaker of unjust laws who expected – no wanted – to go to jail, and at times,  as Joy James reminds us, a political prisoner. Often lost in the discussion is this: that famous letter from Birmingham was written from jailThe Radical King was a democratic socialist, an intersectional analyst who linked white supremacy and capitalism, a critic of war and U.S. imperialism, and a proponent of a revolution of values. Who knows — had he lived long enough, he may well have found himself an advocate too for prison abolition.

But what does it mean to #ReclaimKing at this moment? 2015 is not 1965. Ferguson is not Birmingham; Staten Island is not Selma. The Radical King must be fully embraced with a complete and nuanced understanding of his time and context as well as our own.

No, the legacy of King and the Civil Rights Movement can no longer be sanitized, but it cannot be uncritically, causally reclaimed either. In embracing the full complexity, we must not adhere only to the metaphor, but also the hard realities.  Protest is essential, but it cannot be mere performance and it is never, by itself, enough.  We must develop the long-haul strategies that make for success; that take into account the systems of power which we are engaging.  We must not be naive; if power is confronted, it will strike back. This is part of the turf, however vengeful and unjust it may seem.  This was the brilliance of King and the CRM:  the strategies anticipated and, in fact, relied on excessive responses that revealed the contradictions between legal “justice” and the violence that is inflicted by the state.

The radical vision demands so much more of us. It demands a lifetime commitment and a willingness to risk – everything if need be – with the expectation of the powerful backlash.  This must be factored into our work – not because we are martyrs, but because we are savvy and delusion free.  The test will be how we can walk into the center of the storms in our own era, stand through them, and see our way to the other side.

Last week I was in downtown Oakland, in the midst of 96 hours of MLK Weekend Action, and as usual, the movement there said it/did best. A coterie of marchers appeared and delivered this chant – not a call to reclaim and then repossess – but this:

“#FreeMLK!”

Read that Letter again with this in mind.

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CI: The Year of Resistance 2015

January 07, 2015 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Anti-Racism, Civil Rights, Criminal Injustice Series, Eco-Justice, Economic Terrorism, Intersectionality, Military Industrial Complex, Prison Industrial Complex, What People are Doing to Change the World

Criminal InJustice is a weekly series devoted to taking action against inequities in the U.S. criminal justice system. Nancy A. Heitzeg, Professor of Sociology and Race/Ethnicity, is the Editor of CI. Kay Whitlock, co-author of Queer (In)Justice, is contributing editor of CI. Criminal Injustice is published every Wednesday at 6 pm.

 

The Year of Resistance 2015

eric-garner-protests-11

2015 will be the Year of Resistance where we are all called to stand  – in whatever ways we can — against the hegemony of brutal policing and punishment, against the callous capitalism which destroys our lives and the planet, against the charlatans who profit off protest, against the smoke and mirrors of treacherous/tepid calls for reform.

Be ready for anything. Stop for nothing.

Let history be your weapon.

But Stand too — for Another Way.