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Welcome to the ‘Education’ Archive


Here you will find all archived articles and posts under the selected category. Thank you for visiting and supporting the movement.

Wellstone! (July 21, 1944 – October 25, 2002)

October 25, 2014 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: 2014 Mid-term Elections, Civil Rights, Corrupt Judiciary, Corrupt Legislature, Education, Government for Good, Military Industrial Complex, What People are Doing to Change the World

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On this day in 2002,  Senator Paul Wellstone, his wife Sheila, daughter Marcia and five others died in that fateful plane crash. His legacy and his words speak for themselves, and remind us, always, of what government for good can do.  He was The Conscience of the Senate, the First and Last of a kind. Thank you Paul.

If there is history left to be written, it will noted that his death changed the trajectory of U.S. politics in tragic and perhaps irreparable ways. The people are left without a stanch and fearless defender; we are on our own.

And We Will Never Park the Bus.

Steve Heitzeg has put together a bench memorial to Paul Wellstone. On the bench is a photograph of a smiling Wellstone, along with a Wellstone quote about social justice. (MPR Photo/ Mark Zdechlik)

Steve Heitzeg has put together a bench memorial to Paul Wellstone. On the bench is a photograph of a smiling Wellstone, along with a Wellstone quote about social justice. (MPR Photo/ Mark Zdechlik)

Wellstone’s Revenge: How Minnesota Democrats Took Their State Back

MPR, Memorials Keep Paul Wellstone’s Memory Alive

Al Franken, Paul Wellstone’s Legacy, 10 Years Later

Wellstone Action

Wellstone!

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“Politics is not about power. Politics is not about money. Politics is not about winning for the sake of winning. Politics is about the improvement of people’s lives.”

~ Senator Paul Wellstone ((July 21, 1944 – October 25, 2002)

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CI: Ending the School to Prison Pipeline

October 08, 2014 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Civil Rights, Criminal Injustice Series, Education, Intersectionality, Prison Industrial Complex

Criminal InJustice is a weekly series devoted to taking action against inequities in the U.S. criminal justice system. Nancy A. Heitzeg, Professor of Sociology and Race/Ethnicity, is the Editor of CI. Kay Whitlock, co-author of Queer (In)Justice, is contributing editor of CI. Criminal Injustice is published every Wednesday at 6 pm.

 

Ending the School to Prison Pipeline
by nancy a heitzeg

This week marks the  5th Annual National Week of Action Against School Pushout October 4-11, 2014, brought to you by Dignity in Schools. On-going actions where ever you are can be found here.

CI has written extensively on the school to prison pipeline over the years. Some key selections include:

Given the new Federal Guidelines which call for suspension/expulsion as the last resort. there has recently been movement towards disrupting the pipeline. But continued pressure is required still that became crystal clear again last week. The Coalition for Critical Change ,Twin Cities held a community forum on the stpp with the candidates for Minneapolis School Board. Even given the advertized agenda, it was difficult to fully engage the necessary questions regarding a  focus on school policy ( not anthologizing  families of color), bans on suspensions that go beyond the 2nd grade, removing police from the schools, and promoting transfornative justice models that seek to address systems rather than putting the onus only on youth.

Much gratitude to Dignity in Schools and to all  those who do the work every day.

Highlights form last years’ National Week of Action Against School Pushout below.

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CI: Off Track, The Myth of American Justice

September 24, 2014 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Civil Rights, Corrupt Judiciary, Corrupt Legislature, Criminal Injustice Series, Education, Intersectionality, Prison Industrial Complex

Criminal InJustice is a weekly series devoted to taking action against inequities in the U.S. criminal justice system. Nancy A. Heitzeg, Professor of Sociology and Race/Ethnicity, is the Editor of CI. Kay Whitlock, co-author of Queer (In)Justice, is contributing editor of CI. Criminal Injustice is published every Wednesday at 6 pm.

 

Off Track, The Myth of American Justice
by nancy a heitzeg

He could have said it anywhere, in Ferguson or Florida, in Los Angeles or the Bronx, in any Southern town from Emmett Till up till now. The song remains the same. But how many times has he said this to a room, during a moment, at what appears to be a turning point? Shouting in the wilderness is one thing. What must it be like to shout where everyone can hear you, to room after room full of people, to have everyone  nod their heads and the newspapers back you and millions rally to your cause and still nothing changes? How many times can you repeat the truth? ~ Emmett Rensin, After the Train Leaves Town: A Report from Ferguson

The swirl of headlines and response is dizzying. Drip, drip, drip.

Justice for Mike Brown, for Ezell Ford, for Eric Garner, John CrawfordRekia Boyd, Marissa Alexander, Jordan Davis (again) !  More. Fire Ray Rice, fire Adrian Peterson, fire Roger Goodell, Don Lemon too! More. Arrest Darren Wilson! Convict Michael Dunn! More.  One by one by one.

Send $$$, send water, send gas masks. More. #Hashtag it. Facebook it. Petition it.  Mobilize. March. Send Selfies with Signs.  More. Then Do It Again. Click, click, click.

train_tracks_and_approaching_train_by_ffelkat-d5cw2lsThe need to react to immediate injustice is understandable. So too, the desire to have systems that supposedly dispense ” justice” to do so equally, and to hold all perpetrators – be they police or pro athletes – accountable. It is easy to understand the lull of specific debates and focused actions. But as both a participant in and scholar/observer of social movements – particularly those directed towards the criminal “justice” system, i have many questions.

These have come to the fore again in the midst of the seeming national escalation of police violence, the wave of family violence cases involving NFL players, and finally, in a local event that revealing in microcosm a political landscape always marred by personal agendas and political in-fighting, non-profits protecting their money, a projecting power structure that appeals to fear, and  a media eager to report the small details, the specific skirmish, but in total avoidance of the systemic and structural issues which ultimately provide the frame.

Is this case by case approach enough? Can it be sustained? Are there more tools — questions to be asked, cautions to be raised about their most effective use? Are these the right questions to ask or demands to make ? What are the possibilities for proactive engagement rather than the endless hydraulic of reaction and retrenchment? Can we define the terms of debate on our own new terrain? Can we go bigger?

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CI: Call for Submissions, Special #Mike Brown/#Ferguson Issue of ProudFlesh

September 17, 2014 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Anti-Racism, Arts and Culture, Civil Rights, Criminal Injustice Series, Education, Intersectionality, Prison Industrial Complex, What People are Doing to Change the World

Criminal InJustice is a weekly series devoted to taking action against inequities in the U.S. criminal justice system. Nancy A. Heitzeg, Professor of Sociology and Race/Ethnicity, is the Editor of CI. Kay Whitlock, co-author of Queer (In)Justice, is contributing editor of CI. Criminal Injustice is published every Wednesday at 6 pm.

 

Call for Submissions, Special Mike Brown/Ferguson Issue of ProudFlesh
from nancy a heitzeg

PF pngProudFlesh: New Afrikan Journal of Culture, Politics, and Consciousness is seeking submission for a Special Edition on Mike Brown and Ferguson.  ( ProudFlesh: New Afrikan Journal of Culture, Politics and Consciousness is a peer-reviewed journal, a terrain for promoting exchange, thinking, for igniting the common impulse to create, to perform, to interrogate in spite of the odds fueled by repression and rootlessness.)

This Special On-line Issue, modeled after the Special Issue Dedicated to Trayvon Martin, will offer a collection of critical responses to Ferguson, with a focus on:

  • race and criminalization, especially of Black youth;
  • the role of police/policing in the repression of communities of color, including escalating militarization; and
  • resistance, protest and emergent movement, with special consideration of the role of social media in mobilization.

Submissions may include:

  • Scholarly works,
  • Blog posts
  • Creative works such as poetry art and music

Guest Editors for this Special Edition are ​Nancy A. Heitzeg, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Critical Studies of Race and Ethnicity, St. Catherine University naheitzeg@stkate.edu and Rose M. Brewer, Ph.D. Professor of African American & African Studies, University of Minnesota brewe001@umn.edu

Please submit all pieces for consideration via e-mail by October 1, 2014. You are encouraged to share this request widely with your networks.

Thank You!

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CI: “PriSchool” ~ Architecture of Oppression

September 10, 2014 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Anti-Racism, Civil Rights, Criminal Injustice Series, Education, Intersectionality, Prison Industrial Complex

Criminal InJustice is a weekly series devoted to taking action against inequities in the U.S. criminal justice system. Nancy A. Heitzeg, Professor of Sociology and Race/Ethnicity, is the Editor of CI. Kay Whitlock, co-author of Queer (In)Justice, is contributing editor of CI. Criminal Injustice is published every Wednesday at 6 pm.

 

“PriSchool” ~ Architecture of Oppression

by Kay Whitlock and Nancy A Heitzeg

The thesis looks to address the outflow of prisoners and combat the challenges of recidivism.  This is done through the implementation of a new typology of prison facility that symbiotically merges the program of incarceration and education.  The prison would be a prison for non-violent drug offenders.  The school would be a school of criminology and criminal justice.  Glen J. Santayana

It’s a prison! And a school! What could possibly be more American in the age of “colorblindness,” privatization and austerity?

Looking like a gigantic set of stacked animal cages and set off  by a dry moat (a new urban iteration of the “ha ha wall”), the so-called (and coyly named)  “PriSchool” is perhaps the most obviously (perhaps unintentionally)  grotesque example of the kind of proposed criminal legal system “reform” being advanced these days. One need not question Glen Santayana’s presumably good intentions in order to challenge the design, and assumptions on which it appears to be based.

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Maybe the “stacked animal cages” look isn’t entirely coincidental. The “school” part of the design is twofold: vocational skills – carpentry, cooking, mechanics, beautyshop/barbering, etc. – will be taught to prisoners who, in turn, may obtain a GED and will be studied by “interact with” non-inmate students  pursuing knowledge at the PriSchool’s School of Criminology and Criminal Justice. In time, former prisoners may be hired as snitches consultants to criminal investigations.

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Revelations: “Peace Begins in a Single Chair…”

August 03, 2014 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Arts and Culture, Eco-Justice, Education, Imperialism, Intersectionality, Military Industrial Complex, What People are Doing to Change the World

Ode to the chair

Pablo Neruda (from Odes to Common Things)

vineA chair in the jungle:
under the severe lianas
a sacred tree trunk creaks,
tangles of vines press high,
in the shadows
bloody beasts cry out,
majestic leaves descend from the green sky,
the rattles of snakes
quiver like bells.
A bird spanned the sprawling greenness,
like an arrow shot through a flag,
and branches hoisted high their violins.
Insects
pray in stillness,
seated on their wild bouquets.
Feet sink into
the black sargasso
of the watery jungle,
into the rainforest’s tumbled clouds.
I only request one thing
for the stranger,
for the desperate
explorer,
a chair in the tree of chairs,
a throne,
disheveled and plush,
the velvet of a deep easy chair,
eaten away by creepers.
Yes,
a chair, 
loving the universe, 
for the walkabout man, 
the sure 
foundation, 
the supreme 
dignity 
of rest!

Behind thirsty tigers,
bands of bloodthirsty flies,
behind the black expanse
of ghost-ridden leaves,
behind the low waters,
the thicket like iron,
perpetual snakes,
in the middle
of the thunder,
a chair,
a chair 
for me, 
for everyone,
a chair not 
only for the weary body’s 
rescue, 
but also for everything, 
and for everybody, 
to renew lost strength, 
and for meditation. 

War is wide like the light-starved jungle.
Peace 
begins 
in 

single 
chair.

Revelations: Bed Peace ☮ ☮ ☮

July 27, 2014 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Arts and Culture, Civil Rights, Education, Immigration, International Law, Intersectionality, Military Industrial Complex, Spirituality, What People are Doing to Change the World

BED PEACE ☮ ☮ ☮

Directed by Yoko Ono & John Lennon
Starring John Lennon & Yoko Ono
Bag Productions
Copyright © 1969 Yoko Ono Lennon.

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Revelations: ‘The End of the World’

July 20, 2014 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Eco-Justice, Education, Intersectionality, Science/Technology

Crater

Large crater appears at the ‘end of the world’, Siberian Times

“The striking puncture in the earth is believed to be up to 80 metres wide but its depth is not estimated yet. A scientific team has been sent to investigate the hole and is due to arrive at the scene on Wednesday.

The cause of its sudden appearance in Yamal – its name means the ‘end of the world’ in the far north of Siberia – is not yet known, though one scientific claim is that global warming may be to blame.

There is additionally speculation it could be caused by a space object – perhaps a meteorite – striking earth or that it is a sinkhole caused by collapsing rock beneath the hole caused by as yet unknown…

Anna Kurchatova from Sub-Arctic Scientific Research Centre thinks the crater was formed by a water, salt and gas mixture igniting an underground explosion, the result of global warming. She postulates that gas accumulated in ice mixed with sand beneath the surface, and that this was mixed with salt – some 10,000 years ago this area was a sea.

Global warming, causing an ‘alarming’ melt in the permafrost, released gas causing an effect like the popping of a Champagne bottle cork, she suggests.”