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Revelations: Koyaanisqatsi

February 15, 2015 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Arts and Culture, Civil Rights, Eco-Justice, Economic Terrorism, What People are Doing to Change the World

The Last Rainforest  Keith Haring 1989

The Last Rainforest
Keith Haring 1989

Keith Haring: The Political Line | de Young

US faces worst droughts in 1,000 years, predict scientists

Greenland’s hidden meltwater lakes store up trouble

Global Divestment Day: ‘We are ready for urgent action on climate change’

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Revelations: “Everybody Knows…”

February 08, 2015 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Arts and Culture, Eco-Justice, Intersectionality, What People are Doing to Change the World

"Everybody Knows Where Meat Comes From, It Comes from  the Store" Keith Haring, 1978

“Everybody Knows Where Meat Comes From It Comes from the Store.” Keith Haring, 1978

Keith Haring: The Political Line | de Young

CI: The Rock, Reclaimed

January 14, 2015 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Arts and Culture, Civil Rights, Criminal Injustice Series, Eco-Justice, Intersectionality, Prison Industrial Complex

Criminal InJustice is a weekly series devoted to taking action against inequities in the U.S. criminal justice system. Nancy A. Heitzeg, Professor of Sociology and Race/Ethnicity, is the Editor of CI. Kay Whitlock, co-author of Queer (In)Justice, is contributing editor of CI. Criminal Injustice is published every Wednesday at 6 pm.

 

The Rock, Reclaimed
by nancy a heitzeg

Walls Will Crumble 1/12/15

All Walls Will Crumble

Some day when i am not 10,000 Light Years from Home and wind- swept, i will have more to say about Alcatraz. The island turned fortress, turned brutal end- of -the -line Federal prison, turned wildly popular National Park – referred to recently as “prison as Disneyland.” Much has been said already, much remains still buried in creases of the thick files of men who served there, dutifully read/coded by me and graduate student comrades for a man who refused to understand. Simultaneously sensationalized and trivialized, Alcatraz remains an enigma, seen by so many millions, yet eternally shrouded in ubiquitous fog.

It is clear that this was a prison, but i wonder how those who come from other less locked up nations or who don’t think about mass incarceration every day see  — if they do — the connection to now. The museum exhibit on Federal Prisons conveniently ends at 1991, and there is a prevailing sense that all this is past and far away, in a bygone era of gangsters and great escapes. Even a major art installation on political prisoners by Chinese dissident Ai Weiwei somehow masks the scope of the American Gulag. Amongst only a handful of USA prisoners noted in the multimedia installation, you can, for example, write a postcard to Chelsea Manning but none to Leonard Peltier.

Trinity

Trinity

But maybe, despite the billing, Alcatraz is really no longer even a prison at all – it has been reclaimed. First by the American Indian Occupation – still in evidence by writing on the walls. But reclaimed by Nature too. Every time i have been there i  am struck again by the utter defeat of past evil, erased now by the succulent gardens, the surprise of a hummingbird, the brilliant blooms, the bright banana slugs that line the rocks. Alcatraces is left to its’ namesakes, to the rule of the sea birds, who, as in so many ancient abandoned places, oversee all to the last detail.  Even unto the ferry ride out. They must make sure you have left there, and only willingly – if ever –  return.

May this be a metaphor for the entirety of this Prison Nation.

Let it be so.

The King of Alcatraz

The King of Alcatraz

Revelations: Lucky

January 12, 2015 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Arts and Culture, Eco-Justice, Intersectionality, Spirituality

Lucky I me and Muir Woods 1/11/2015

Lucky I
me and Muir Woods 1/11/2015

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Revelations: Rise Like Lions…

January 04, 2015 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Arts and Culture, Eco-Justice, Intersectionality

2014 Wildlife photographer of the Year overall and black and white category winner: The last great picture by Michael ‘Nick’ Nichols (USA) showing five female lions at rest with their cubs in Tanzania’s Serengeti national park. Photograph: Michael Nichols/2014 WPY

2014 Wildlife photographer of the Year overall and black and white category winner: The last great picture by Michael ‘Nick’ Nichols (USA) showing five female lions at rest with their cubs in Tanzania’s Serengeti national park.
Photograph: Michael Nichols/2014 WPY

2014 Wildlife Photography Awards Round-up – in pictures

Animal Photographs of the Year 2014

“Rise like Lions after slumber
In unvanquishable number-
Ye are many-they are few.”

― Percy Bysshe Shelley, The Masque of Anarchy: Written on Occasion of the Massacre at Manchester

Revelations: Tatanka

November 16, 2014 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Eco-Justice, Imperialism, Intersectionality

BBF

Buffalo Field Campaign

Current News from Volunteers in the Field
Help STOP THE SLAUGHTER of the Yellowstone Buffalo!

Press Release 11/13/14
Endangered Species Act Protection Sought for the Imperiled Yellowstone Bison
Download the Endangered Species Act Petition, PDF

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Revelations: Ecocide

November 09, 2014 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Eco-Justice, Economic Terrorism

UN

Climate change threatens irreversible and dangerous impacts, but options exist to limit its effects, IPCC Report, November 2, 2014

 

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Revelations: Goddess of the Taiga

October 19, 2014 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Arts and Culture, Eco-Justice, Intersectionality, What People are Doing to Change the World

Amur Tiger. Photograph: Toshiji Fukada

Amur Tiger. Photograph: Toshiji Fukada

Struggle Against Extinction

This year’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition will again document the planet’s rarest animals and focus on the twists of fate that decide survival

Toshiji Fukuda went to extraordinary lengths to photograph an Amur tiger, one of the world’s rarest mammals, in 2011. He built a tiny wooden hut overlooking a beach in Russia’s remote Lazovsky nature reserve, on the Sea of Japan, and spent the winter there. Fukuda was 63 at the time. “Older people have one advantage: time passes more quickly for us than the young,” he said later.

Possession of such resilience was fortunate because Fukuda had to wait seven weeks for his only glimpse of an Amur tiger, which resulted in a single stunning image of the animal strolling imperiously along the beach below his hide. “It was as if the goddess of the Taiga had appeared before me,” he recalled…

50 Years of Wildlife Photographer of the Year – in pictures