Subscribe

A Storm Gathers for North American Birds

September 21, 2014 By: seeta Category: 2014 Mid-term Elections, 2016 Election, Eco-Justice, Science/Technology

climatechange

Note: Streets in New York City and other towns are being taken over by marchers Sunday in what will be the largest climate change protest in history. The People’s Climate March is timed to draw the notice of world leaders gathering for this week’s U.N. Climate Summit. As the New York march prepared to get underway at its official start time of 11:30 a.m. ET, protesters elsewhere were already celebrating large turnouts. A Twitter feed at the march’s website showed crowds of demonstrators marching in Perth and Melbourne, in London and Dublin, and in Johannesburg and Tanzania. (NPR)

From The National Audubon Society:

The numbers are stark: Of the 588 species Audubon studied, 314 are likely to find themselves in dire straits by 2080. Unless, that is, the oil boomers in the Bakken—and everyone else—start to consider the future. Unless we begin to reduce the severity of global warming and buy birds more time to adapt to the changes coming their way.

Global climate is changing in ways not seen for millennia, and we know humans bear at least part of the responsibility. We also know that these changes are affecting animals large and small. For years scientists have been telling us that the ranges of bears, butterflies, and many other species are shifting north and toward the poles; that bird migrations are changing time and course; and that pollinators are trying to adjust to new flowering schedules. These alarming observations are only the beginning.

State of the Birds

2014 Watch List

Revelations: ‘The End of the World’

July 20, 2014 By: nancy a heitzeg Category: Eco-Justice, Education, Intersectionality, Science/Technology

Crater

Large crater appears at the ‘end of the world’, Siberian Times

“The striking puncture in the earth is believed to be up to 80 metres wide but its depth is not estimated yet. A scientific team has been sent to investigate the hole and is due to arrive at the scene on Wednesday.

The cause of its sudden appearance in Yamal – its name means the ‘end of the world’ in the far north of Siberia – is not yet known, though one scientific claim is that global warming may be to blame.

There is additionally speculation it could be caused by a space object – perhaps a meteorite – striking earth or that it is a sinkhole caused by collapsing rock beneath the hole caused by as yet unknown…

Anna Kurchatova from Sub-Arctic Scientific Research Centre thinks the crater was formed by a water, salt and gas mixture igniting an underground explosion, the result of global warming. She postulates that gas accumulated in ice mixed with sand beneath the surface, and that this was mixed with salt – some 10,000 years ago this area was a sea.

Global warming, causing an ‘alarming’ melt in the permafrost, released gas causing an effect like the popping of a Champagne bottle cork, she suggests.”

The Crisis of Our Times: 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 seconds

November 20, 2012 By: seeta Category: Civil Rights, Eco-Justice, Science/Technology

Sandy: Is This the End?, Danny: It’s Only the Beginning #hurricanesandy #climatechange

October 31, 2012 By: seeta Category: 2012 Election, Civil Rights, Eco-Justice, Science/Technology, Spirituality

From Scientific American:

Hurricane Sandy has emboldened more scientists to directly link climate change and storms, without the hedge. On Monday, as Sandy came ashore in New Jersey, Jonathan Foley, director of the Institute on the Environment at the University of Minnesota, tweeted: “Would this kind of storm happen without climate change? Yes. Fueled by many factors. Is [the] storm stronger because of climate change? Yes.”

Raymond Bradley, director of the Climate Systems Research Center at the University of Massachusetts, was quoted in the Vancouver Sun saying: “When storms develop, when they do hit the coast, they are going to be bigger and I think that’s a fair statement that most people could sign onto.”

A recent, peer-reviewed study published by several authors in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science concludes: “The largest cyclones are most affected by warmer conditions and we detect a statistically significant trend in the frequency of large surge events (roughly corresponding to tropical storm size) since 1923.”

Greg Laden, an anthropologist who blogs about culture and science, wrote this week in an online piece: “There is always going to be variation in temperature or some other weather related factor, but global warming raises the baseline. That’s true. But the corollary to that is NOT that you can’t link climate change to a given storm. All storms are weather, all weather is the immediate manifestation of climate, climate change is about climate.”

As We Usher In First Day of Autumn, Planetary Emergency Awaits

September 22, 2012 By: seeta Category: Eco-Justice, Economic Development, Science/Technology, Spirituality


Today is the first day of Fall in the northern hemisphere. As we usher in the first day of fall after a summer of record heat and drought, not only will the fall foliage be endangered, but a planetary emergency of epic proportions also awaits us as scientists have announced no sea ice will be left in a decade if we continue on the path we’re on:

“Between 1979 and 2012, we have a decline of 13 percent per decade in the sea ice, accelerating from six percent between 1979 and 2000,” said oceanographer Wieslaw Maslowski with the US Naval Postgraduate School, speaking at the Greenpeace event.

“If this trend continues we will not have sea ice by the end of this decade,” said Maslowski.

One consequence of the melt is the slow but continuous rise in the ocean level that threatens coastal areas.

Another result is the likely release of large amounts of methane — a greenhouse gas — trapped in the permafrost under Greenland’s ice cap, the remains of the region’s organic plant and animal life that were trapped in sediment and later covered by ice sheets in the last Ice Age.

Methane is 25 times more efficient at trapping solar heat than carbon dioxide, and the released gases could in turn add to global warming, which in turn would free up more locked-up carbon.

Some see the Arctic melt as a business opportunity — a chance to reach the oil and gas riches under the seabed, and a path for ships to shorten the distance between ports and saving time and fuel.

According to the US Geological Survey, within the Arctic Circle there are some 90 million barrels of oil — 13 percent of the planet’s undiscovered oil reserves and 30 percent of its undiscovered natural gas.

The accelerating rate of climate change not only endangers the ecosystem, but also endangers businesses and democracies. This isn’t hyperbole, folks. It’s high time we all start leading more environmentally conscious lives as individuals invested in planetary citizenship.